Monday, June 30, 2014

FAMILY GROUP FOR CAROLINE AUGUSTA WOODHOUSE AND DR. WILLIAM WOODBURY WATKINS

FAMILY GROUP FOR CAROLINE AUGUSTA WOODHOUSE AND DR. WILLIAM WOODBURY WATKINS


THE CHILDREN OF CAROLINE AUGUSTA WOODHOUSE AND DR. WILLIAM WOODBURY WATKINS

THE CHILDREN OF CAROLINE AUGUSTA WOODHOUSE AND DR. WILLIAM WOODBURY WATKINS
 


 
Caroline Augusta Woodhouse
and
Dr, William Woodbury Watkins
 
 
Had a total of eight Children and only three survived to Adulthood.
 
 
I went to Fredericktown Madison County Missouri Historical Society [June 23-26, 2014] To work on the Woodhouse Genealogy. 
 
Now I have placed all of my findings into my family tree maker.
 
 
Caroline Augusta Woodhouse AKA Caddie Woodlawn the Heroine in her Granddaughters Novel.  By Carol Ryrie Brink.
 
 
Jeannette K. Rook

Sunday, June 29, 2014

Death Record of David Nevin Swanzey


South Dakota Death Index, 1905-1955 about David N. Swanzey
Name: David N. Swanzey Certificate Number #: 181881 Death Day: 9 Death Month: Apr Death Year: 1938 County Pennington Page Number: 741 Source Information: South Dakota Department of Health. Index to South Dakota Death Records, 1905-1955. Pierre, SD, USA: South Dakota Department of Health.

 

 Source:
http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&db=SDdeaths&rank=1&new=1&MSAV=1&msT=1&gss=angs-d&gsfn=David&gsfn_x=XO&gsln=Swanzey&gsln_x=NP_NN&uidh=v5j&pcat=34&fh=0&h=157558&recoff=7+9&ml_rpos=1

 

Web Source Image Index:
http://interactive.ancestry.com/8659/SDVR_D_3-0908-S/157558?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3findiv%3d1%26db%3dSDdeaths%26rank%3d1%26new%3d1%26MSAV%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gss%3dangs-d%26gsfn%3dDavid%26gsfn_x%3dXO%26gsln%3dSwanzey%26gsln_x%3dNP_NN%26uidh%3dv5j%26pcat%3d34%26fh%3d0%26h%3d157558%26recoff%3d7%2b9%26ml_rpos%3d1&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnRecord

DEATH RECORD OF NATHAN WILLIAM DOW


South Dakota Index, 1905-1955 about Nathan W. Don [Correction Dow]
Name: Nathan W. Don [Don Nathan W.] Certificate Number: 21760 Death Day: 13 Death Month: May Death Year 1944 County Kingsbury. Source Information: South Dakota Department of Health. Index to South Dakota Death Records, 1905-1955. Pierre, SD, USA: South Dakota Department of Health.

Family Group Sheet For Laura Elizabeth Bessie Ingalls and Almanzo Wilder


FAMILY GROUP SHEET FOR CAROLINE carrie INGALLS WITH DAVID NEVIN SWANZEY AND STEP CHILDREN


Family Group Sheet For Grace Pearl Ingalls and Nathan William Dow


Monday, June 23, 2014

FROM NINE TO FIVE BY JO FISCHER AUGUST 24, 1954 SIXTY YEARS AGO WITH TODAYS SAME OLD PROBLEMS



The Times Picayune
Tuesday August 24, 1954
page 25

You won't have to wait any loner to see Mr. Wump.  Your company just called up to say they've gone out of business

GONE OUT OF BUSINESS

Sunday, June 22, 2014

THE FIRST PERSON Commentary and to criticize Social Media ELLA CHEEVER THAYER

THE FIRST PERSON Commentary and to  criticize Social Media  ELLA CHEEVER THAYER 
 
 
 
The Hidden story of Wired Love Dots and Dashes.  This novel was published in 1879 about the first online Romance.  Ella Cheever Thayer by occupation was a telegraph operator in Boston Massachusetts to Support herself..
 
She writes this cute story about a Romance between Nettie Rogers  and Clem Stanwood whom are Telegraph operators.  They first start communicating through the first social network the Morse Code.  Nettie didn't know Clem his handlers name was C.  That is how they communicating through their handlers names.
 
In the book she does point out the dangers of Online flirtation when the:  Chapter VI Collapse of Romance  THE DARK SIDE ON NOT KNOWING WHO IS ON THE OTHER SIDE
 
Drunken fat Red hair Dutchman
Page 58-62
A frightful man whom Nattie believes in Operator C.  He is scary, smelly and drunk.  Nattie is scare by this encounter.  Due to this meeting, she brushes off Clem.  Quimby tells Nattie that something like this could have ended in tragedy and this was dangerous.  Quimby has a romantic interest in Nattie and he felt the need to protect her.
 
That fat Dutchman knows Clem.  He takes it upon himself to impersonate as C.  Fraudulent meeting which causes Nattie to ignore C.
 
Note: Chapter VI Collapse of Romance
 The dark side of the Online Romance
The Dark side of this tail is that this fat red breaded smelly drunken man decided upon himself to pose as somebody that he is not C that Nattie picture. And this placed a terrible scare and fear into her heart and soul that this monstrous man poses as the dark side of unfortunate Consequences of an online Romance of a party she has not seen face to face.  To this point she discontinues the Romance with C.
 
However, Clem doesn't understand why Nettie breaks it off with him and this is what he does:
 
C  Clem Stanwood
Page 9, 15, 72, 80 & 81
 
C stands for His handler’s name--First Nettie Knows him as Handler C.
     Stranger handsome young man Pg 72--Since she doesn't return any communication with Clem he appears to her as the handsome stranger and he doesn't tell her who he is.
     Clem Stanwood is reveals  Operator C  Page 80 & 81 and a college buddy of Quimby.  At the Sunday Feast Clem tells Nettie who he is.
 
However, in the Book She drops three  hints  through novels written by Charles Dickens.
 
 
Special Note: the Author is influenced heavily by Charles Dickens  She mentions three  novels by Mr. Dickens
1.       The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit of Social Criticisms Published 1844 pg 26
Social Criticism
 
 
Source:
 
2.       Our Mutual Friend Published 1864 pg 99
               Social Commentary
 

 
Source:
 
 
 
 
3.        Dombey & Sons 1848 Pg 74
                                           Social Criticism
 
 
Source:
Two Novels by Dickens are about Criticism and one is commentary.  Today we do get a lot of Commentary about the Internet and through the fact we use a lot of Social Media such as Facebook and Twitter. 
 
Social Media can be used for positive information for example a recall on a bad product.  Or it can be used from Fraud or something more sinister.  It all comes down to buyer be aware.  If something sounds to good to be true always research or walk away.
 
In the Story Cyn tells Nettie they should wired the rooms up so they can socialize with one another which creates the first chat room among friends.  So Chat Rooms are not new.  Its just more used today to talk with people all over the world.
 
Also I like how Ella, brings to the front as commentary about the dangers online Communication with someone that was a total Stranger.  In this world we have seen to many online stories that don't always end on positive note.
 
Wired Love I believe is the book to deal with the Positives and negatives online Romances.  People call this book cute.  I do think its cute, however, I have addressed the positives and negatives.  She clearly by using Charles Dickens who was a social commentator and Criticizer in her book.  Was that clever of her?
 
Yes that was very clever of Ella to use Charles Dickens novels to express how she felt about online romances and communicating with friends. 
 
 The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit of Social Criticisms Published 1844
Our Mutual Friend Published of Social Commentary 1864
Dombey & Sons  Social Criticisms 1848
 
Amazon.com
 
These novels are available for Purchase the following Novels through Amazon.com
The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit of Social Criticisms Published 1844
Our Mutual Friend Published of Social Commentary 1864
Dombey & Sons  Social Criticisms 1848
Wired Love Dots and Dashes by Ella Cheever Thayer
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


THE CHARACTERS OF WIRED LOVE Compiled by Jeannette K. Rook February 23, 2014


THE CHARACTERS OF WIRED LOVE
                                  DOTS AND DASHES
                                                       Compiled by Jeannette K. Rook
                                                                       February 23, 2014



•––  •• •—•• •   –••    •–••   –––  •••— 

W    I    R       E  D         L        O    V         E

 

–•• ––– •••   •—  —• –••   –••  •–  ••• •••• •  •••

D      O   T    S         A        N    D          D      A     S        H         E   S

TITLED: WIRED LOVE DOTS AND DASHES
AUTHOR: ELLA CHEEVER THAYER [1849-1925]
PUBLISHED: 1879

FREE DOWN LOAD
http://books.google.com/books/about/Wired_Love.html?id=BjAOAAAAYAAJ

Wired Love: A Romance of Dots and Dashes

This book published in 1879 mulls what how authentic a romance can be that is mediated over the wire by two telegraph operators.

Anexcerpt from the book:But a very significant noise to Miss Nathalie Rogers, or Nattie, as she was usually abbreviated; a noise that caused her to lay aside her book,and jump up hastily, exclaiming, with a gesture of impatience:--"Somebody always 'calls' me in the middle of every entertaining chapter!" For that noise, that little clatter, like, and yet too irregular to be the ticking of a clock, expressed to Nattie these four mystic letters:--"B m--X n;"which same four mystic letters, interpreted, meant that the name, or, to use the technical word, "call," of the telegraph office over which she was present sole presiding genius, was "B m," and that "Bm" was wanted by another office on the wire, designated as "X n."A little, out-of-the-way, country office, some fifty miles down the line, was "X n," and, as Nattie signaled in reply to the "call" her readiness to receive any communications therefrom, she was conscious of holding in some slight contempt the possible abilities of the human portion of its machinery. For who but an operator very green in the profession would stay _there_?Consequently, she was quite unprepared for the velocity with which the telegraph alphabet of sounds in dots and dashes rattled over the instrument, appropriately termed a "sounder," upon which messages are received, and found herself wholly unable to write down the words as fast as they came.
 
Source:
 

Miss Nathalie Rogers
[Nat, Nattie] Page 3
 Telegraph Operator at the age 19.  She is solely supporting herself without the aid of a man. Until one day, she strikes a conversation with operator Handler named C.  The conversation starts out simple and then she wonders C is a man or a woman.  She finds C is a male operator.  Innocent Flirtation starts and they communicate.  C is the one and only Clem Stanwood.  A College Friend of Ralfy Quimby
 Nattie lives in the Hotel Norman owned by Miss Betsy Kling.
 
Miss Nathalie “Nattie” Rogers is a telegraph operator in the town where she lives and resides at the Hotel Norman owned by Miss Betsy King.  In her day to day duties seem dull until she communicates with a handler named C.  She begins to wonder if the handler  is a he or she.  A he reveals his name is Clem.  Nattie is sharing this information about Clem to her friends.
 
Rely Quimby who also resides at the Hotel Norman and a law Clerk who has feelings for Nattie and the need to protect her when he shows concerns about her online communications.  Especially when the Fat  Red Bearded Drunken smelly   Dutchman who claims to be the Telegrapher Operator the Handler C.  Due to this the relationship online discontinues between Clem and Nattie. Clem is not aware of this:
 
Then Nattie tells about her online romance with C. However, a consequence
The Dark side of this tail is that this fat red breaded smelly drunken man decided upon himself to pose as somebody that he is not C that Nattie picture. And this placed a terrible scare and fear into her heart and soul that this monstrous man poses as the dark side of unfortunate Consequences of an online Romance of a party she has not seen face to face.  To this point, she discontinues the Romance with C.  This frustrates C and he didn’t understand why Nattie discontinues.  He shows up as handsome stranger and he doesn’t tell her who he is.
 
Until The Feast
One day Nattie and Miss Cynthia “Cyn” Archer the opera singer decide to have a feast of Sirloin Steak, figs, oranges, Potatoes and Charlotte Russe.  The smell attracts guest and it no longer a feast between two friends.  Quimby,  Mr. Norton,  Celeste, Mrs. Simonson and a guest of Quimby the Stranger man that Nattie met on the job.  Mr. Clem Stanwood a college friend of Quimby.
 
The feast among friends went really well.  Quimby realizes his friend Clem is the handler that Nattie has been communicating with; Quimby realize that, so he tells Clem he has feelings for Nattie, he assumes that Clem is only interested in Cyn.  Everyone assumes that Cyn and Clem are involve which is not the case.  Clem only has feelings for Nattie.
 Clem Stanwood makes it perfectly clear when Miss Kling assumes hank panky is going on when she realize the rooms are wired up and she knew about the feast when she was trying too] evict Nattie from the Hotel.  Clem stands up to her to clear Nattie of any wrong doing and he professes his love for Nattie and in the end they are married.
 
Bm- Xn  
Page 3, 4 & 26
 Female Telegraph Operator: Nattie refers her to as a Mark Tapley Page 26
Human and sarcasms
 
C  Clem Stanwood
Page 9, 15, 72, 80 & 81
C stands for His handler’s name
 Stranger handsome young man Pg 72
 Clem Stanwood is reveals  Operator C  Page 80 & 81 and a college buddy of Quimby.
 
Mrs. Duchess Simonson
Page 14
 Lives in the Same Hotel  Norman with Nattie [Widower]
 
Miss Betsy Kling
Page 14
 
Owner of the Hotel  Norman where Nathalie Roger lives and her interest is Mr. Fishblate:  Miss. Kling charges a flat Rate
 She was not happy about the feast or that the rooms were wired up.  She is a respectable woman.  Until Clem stands, up to her and declares his love for Miss Nathalie Rogers
 
Ralfy Quimby
Page 16
Lives in the Hotel Norman; has feelings for Nattie and he is a law clerk: Ends up proposing to Celeste Fishblate He is also a Law Clerk. He also realizes that he introduces the real C to Nattie who in fact is Clem Stanwood a college acquaintance and friend
When Quimby Purposes Marriage to Nettie he accidentally purposes to Celeste Fishblate:  And he couldn't back out due to the fact that he could be sued for breach of contract.
 
Mr. Jo Norton
Page 17
 Lives in Hotel  Norman Artist, Quite type has reveals emotional side to Miss Cynthia “Cyn” Archer opera Singer
Cyn tell Jo that she is more interest in her singing career and settling with a man is not option in her life and that there is nothing between her and Clem as well.
 
 
 
Celeste Fishblate
Page 17
 
Lives in Hotel Norman with her father are Mr. Fishblate and Celeste has feelings for Ralfy Quimby:  Which Ralfy Quimby does not have the same feelings.  However, Ralfy Quimby Proposes to Celeste thinking she is Nattie:  He does not have the nerve to break it off with Celeste in fear of a lawsuit. 
 
Mr. Fishblate
Page 17
 
Mr. Fishblate is also a resident of the Hotel Norman run by Miss Betsy Kling.  His daughter also resides in the same hotel.  Miss Betsy Kling waits on him and tends to him due to she has feelings for him.  However, he pays her no mind.
 
Male Suitor
Page 18
 
Unknown Male suitor leaves the room of Mrs. Duchess Simonson
 
Miss Cynthia “Cyn” Archer
Page 20 & 43
 Miss Cynthia Archer is opera singer. Her first and only love is her singing career; everyone assumes that Cyn and Clem are going to get married.  Jo Norton professes his love to Cyn.  However, she lets him down easy by saying that she is not interest in any romances in her life.  That she is solely focusing on her career.
 
Miss Archer takes up residence at the Hotel Norman.  She also suggests that the rooms are wire up to communicate.  She learns the Morse code.
Cyn also establish a friendship with Nattie:  Sunday Meal is important event:  A meal between two friends turns into a little social event with the real C is revealed.
 
Z
Page 26
Male Operator
 
The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit of Social Criticisms Published 1844

Mark Tapley
 Page 26
 

 
 
A Game of Love
Source:

 
 
Mark Tapley is a character in Charles Dickens novel The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit of Social Criticisms Published 1844 Is a Satirically as near wilderness with pockets of civilization filled with deceptive and self-promoting hucksters.  When Nattie criticism of female handle Xn
 
Mark Tapley, the good-humored employee of the Blue Dragon Inn and suitor of Mrs. Lupin (the Dragon's owner), leaves that establishment to find work that's more of a credit to his character: that is, work sufficiently miserable that his cheerfulness will be more of a credit to him. He eventually joins Young Martin Chuzzlewit on his trip to America, where he finds at last a situation that requires the full extent of his innate cheerfulness of disposition. Martin buys a piece of land in a settlement called "Eden"—which, if not actually underwater, is at least in the midst of a malarial swamp. Mark nurses him through his illness, and they eventually return to England.
 

Wikipedia
Source:
 
Young Woman
Page 33
 Asked to send a message to John then changes her mind accuses Nattie due her poor handwriting that she could not send john the message:  Not understanding the message is in Morse code
John
Page 33
 The Young Woman’s interest in sending a message to her  John.  Changes her mind and sends it in her own handwriting. Miss understands Nattie’s handwriting
 Commercial Traveler
Page 38
 Who took off with Mrs. Duchess Simonson personal hygiene products?
Lady Clara Vere de  Vere
Page 44
 

Lady Clara Vere de Vere is an English poem written by Alfred Tennyson, part of his collected Poems published in 1842. The poem is about a lady in a family of aristocrats, and includes numerous references to noble, such as to earls or coats of arms. One such line from the poem goes, "Kind hearts are more than coronets, and simple faith than Norman blood." This line gave the title to the film Kind Hearts and Coronets. Lewis Carroll's poem Echoes is based on Lady Clare Vere de Vere.
 
English Poem Lady Clara Vere de  Vere written by Alfred Tennyson published in 1842
Kind Hearts and Cornets
 
Wikipedia 1
Source:
Title: Lady Clara Vere De Vere
Author: Alfred Lord Tennyson [More Titles by Tennyson]
Though this is placed among the poems published in 1833 it first appeared in print in 1842. The subsequent alterations were very slight, and after 1848 none at all were made.

Lady Clara Vere de Vere,
Of me you shall not win renown:
You thought to break a country heart
For pastime, ere you went to town.
At me you smiled, but unbeguiled
I saw the snare, and I retired:
The daughter of a hundred Earls,
You are not one to be desired.

Lady Clara Vere de Vere,
I know you proud to bear your name,
Your pride is yet no mate for mine,
Too proud to care from whence I came.
Nor would I break for your sweet sake
A heart that doats on truer charms.
A simple maiden in her flower
Is worth a hundred coats-of-arms.

Lady Clara Vere de Vere,
Some meeker pupil you must find,
For were you queen of all that is,
I could not stoop to such a mind.
You sought to prove how I could love,
And my disdain is my reply.
The lion on your old stone gates
Is not more cold to you than I.

Lady Clara Vere de Vere,
You put strange memories in my head.
Not thrice your branching limes have blown
Since I beheld young Laurence dead.
Oh your sweet eyes, your low replies:
A great enchantress you may be;
But there was that across his throat
Which you hardly cared to see.

Lady Clara Vere de Vere,
When thus he met his mother's view,
She had the passions of her kind,
She spake some certain truths of you.

Indeed I heard one bitter word
That scarce is fit for you to hear;
Her manners had not that repose
Which stamps the caste of Vere de Vere.

Lady Clara Vere de Vere,
There stands a spectre in your hall:
The guilt of blood is at your door:
You changed a wholesome heart to gall.
You held your course without remorse,
To make him trust his modest worth,
And, last, you fix'd a vacant stare,
And slew him with your noble birth.

Trust me, Clara Vere de Vere,
From yon blue heavens above us bent
The grand old gardener and his wife [1]
Smile at the claims of long descent.
Howe'er it be, it seems to me,
'Tis only noble to be good.
Kind hearts are more than coronets,
And simple faith than Norman blood.

I know you, Clara Vere de Vere:
You pine among your halls and towers:
The languid light of your proud eyes
Is wearied of the rolling hours.
In glowing health, with boundless wealth,
But sickening of a vague disease,
You know so ill to deal with time,
You needs must play such pranks as these.

Clara, Clara Vere de Vere,
If Time be heavy on your hands,
Are there no beggars at your gate,
Nor any poor about your lands?
Oh! teach the orphan-boy to read,
Or teach the orphan-girl to sew,
Pray Heaven for a human heart,
And let the foolish yoeman go.


[Footnote 1: 1842 and 1843. "The gardener Adam and his wife." In 1845 it was altered to the present text.]

[The end]
Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem: Lady Clara Vere De Vere
Source:
 
 
 
Page 56
 Hateful operator signing as M
 
THE NEGATIVE SIDE OF ON LINE ROMANCE
Drunken fat Red hair Dutchman
Page 58-62
 A frightful man whom Nattie believes in Operator C.  He is scary, smelly and drunk.  Nattie is scare by this encounter.  Due to this meeting, she brushes off Clem.  Quimby tells Nattie that something like this could have ended in tragedy and this was dangerous.  Quimby has a romantic interest in Nattie and he felt the need to protect her.
 
That fat Dutchman knows Clem.  He takes it upon himself to impersonate as C.  Fraudulent meeting which causes Nattie to ignore C.
 Note: Chapter VI Collapse of Romance
 The dark side of the Online Romance
 
The Dark side of this tail is that this fat red breaded smelly drunken man decided upon himself to pose as somebody that he is not C that Nattie picture. And this placed a terrible scare and fear into her heart and soul that this monstrous man poses as the dark side of unfortunate Consequences of an online Romance of a party she has not seen face to face.  To this point she discontinues the Romance with C.
 
Charlotte Russe
Pillsbury Recipe
Charlotte Russe de Raspberry
Source:
http://www.pillsbury.com/recipes/charlotte-russe-de-raspberry/2f8a0659-6207-42d4-bf6e-13ba386ec00d
 
Charlotte Russe
Page 74
 Charlotte Russe is a French [Cake] dessert invented by Marie –Antoine Carème [1734-1833] it is sponge cake or Biscuit Cookies with fruit.
 
Charlotte Russe
A charlotte is a type of dessert or trifle that can be serve hot or cold. It can also be known as an "ice-box cake". Bread, sponge cake or biscuits/cookies are used to line a mold, which is then filled with a fruit puree or custard. It can also be made using layers of breadcrumbs.
Classically, stale bread dipped in butter was used as the lining, but sponge cake or ladyfingers may be used today. The filling may be covered with a thin layer of similarly flavored gelatin.
 Wikipedia
Source:
 
Pillsbury Recipe
Charlotte Russe de Raspberry
  • 40 min
  • total time4 hr 40 min
  • ingredients13
  • servings
Ingredients
Dessert
18 ladyfingers
¼ cup orange-flavored liqueur
2/3  cup water
2 envelopes unflavored gelatin
1/4  cup sugar
3 tablespoons lemon juice
1 (10-oz.) pkg. frozen raspberries in syrup, thawed
1 pint (2 cups) whipping cream, whipped
 
Topping
1 tablespoon butter
1/2  cup sliced almonds
2 tablespoons sugar
1/2  cup whipping cream
2  tablespoons powdered sugar
Steps
  • 1Grease 9-inch springform pan with butter. Split ladyfingers lengthwise. Sprinkle cut surfaces with liqueur. Place ladyfingers around sides and in bottom of buttered pan (cut sides facing center and top of pan).
  • 1Grease 9-inch springform pan with butter. Split ladyfingers lengthwise. Sprinkle cut surfaces with liqueur. Place ladyfingers around sides and in bottom of buttered pan (cut sides facing center and top of pan).
  • 2In small saucepan, combine water and gelatin; let stand 2 minutes to soften. Heat mixture over low heat until gelatin dissolves, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat. Stir in 1/4 cup sugar, lemon juice and raspberries; beat with wire whisk until frothy. Refrigerate 15 minutes or just until mixture begins to thicken.
  • 3Gently fold cooled raspberry mixture into whipped cream. Pour into ladyfinger-lined pan. Refrigerate 4 hours or until mixture is set.
  • 4Meanwhile, heat oven to 350°F. Place butter in shallow baking pan. Place pan in oven for 1 to 2 minutes or until butter is melted. Add almonds; stir until well coated. Bake at 350°F. for 8 to 10 minutes or until almonds are light golden brown, stirring occasionally. Remove from oven. Sprinkle with 2 tablespoons sugar; stir to coat. Cool completely.
  • 5In small bowl, combine 1/2 cup whipping cream and 2 tablespoons powdered sugar; beat at high speed until stiff peaks form. Garnish top of dessert with whipped cream and sugared almonds. Store in refrigerator.
EXPERT TIPS
toggle
Expert Tips
Charlottes are molded desserts. The mold is lined with cake and filled with fruit and custard or cream mixed with gelatin. Charlotte russe, made with ladyfingers and rich Bavarian cream, is served with fruit sauce. In our version, raspberries are combined with the cream filling, and toasted almonds add the final touch.
Chilled charlottes must set for hours in the refrigerator, so they are good do-ahead desserts. Prepare this charlotte up to 12 hours in advance.
Source:
 
 
DOMBEY & SON
                                            BY                                       
CHARLES DICKENS
1847
Social Criticism
 
 
 
 
Source:

 

Wikipedia.com
 Domby &  Sons [Dombey & Sons]
Page 75
Where the figs and oranges lay on top.  The feast that Nattie and Cyn are preparing.
 
Our Mutual Friend
                                                                    Social Commentary
Source:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/77/OurMutualFriend.jpg
 
 
 
Mr. Eugene Wrayburn M.R.F. [Our Mutual Friend]
 Page 99
M.R.F. My Respected Father
 Cyn tells of her  pigheaded father is worthy of Eugene Wrayburn’s M.R.F. mutual Friend
 Eugene Sarcastically describes his relationship with his father to his best friend, Mortimer lightwood
 
Title: Our Mutual Friend
Published: December 8,  1864
Monthly Series: May 1864-November 1865
Genre: Social Commentary
Author: Charles Dickens
 
 
Character: Mr. Eugene Wrayburn
Eugene Wrayburn – seen as the second hero of the novel; a barrister, and a gentleman by birth, but characterized as roguish and insolent; close friends with Mortimer Lightwood; involved in a love triangle with Lizzie Hexam and Bradley Headstone, both of whom act as foils, Lizzie providing contrast to Eugene's more negative traits and Headstone making Eugene appear virtuous in comparison; nearly killed by Headstone but, like Harmon/Rokesmith, "reborn" after his incident in the river.[1] Though he appears morally grey throughout most of the novel, by the end he is seen as a moral, sympathetic character and a true gentleman, after choosing to marry Lizzie in order to save her reputation, even though she is below his class.[
 
Mortimer Lightwood – lawyer, acquaintance of the Veneerings and friend of Eugene Wrayburn. It is through him that the reader and the other characters learn about Harmon's will. Lightwood acts as the "storyteller";[4] however, under the "mask of irony"[4] he assumes in telling his stories, he feels true friendship for Eugene, respect for Twemlow, and concern for the issues in which he is involved. In addition, he also serves as the "commentator and a voice of conscience"[5] with sarcasm sometimes covering his concern. Through Lightwood's reason and advice, the reader is better able to judge the characters' actions.
 

Wikipedia
Source:
 
                                                                             M.R.F.
                                          My Respected Father
 
'My respected father has found, down in the parental neighborhood, a wife for his not-generally-respected son.'
'With some money, of course?'
'With some money, of course, or he would not have found her. My respected father? let me shorten the dutiful tautology by substituting in future M. R. F., which sounds military, and rather like the Duke of Wellington.'
'What an absurd fellow you are, Eugene!'
'Not at all, I Assure you. M. R. F. having always in the clearest manner provided (as he calls it) for his children by pre-arranging from the hour of the birth of each, and sometimes from an earlier period, what the devoted little victim's calling and course in life should be, M. R. F. pre-arranged for myself that I was to be the barrister I am (with the slight addition of an enormous practice, which has not accrued), and also the married man I am not.'
-Eugene sarcastically describes his relationship with his father to his best friend, Mortimer Lightwood.
Source:
 
VOCABULARY WORDS
 
Vocabulary
 
1.       Besmeared page 6-To Smear
 
2.       Incredulous page 7-unconvinced
 
3.       Trifling Page 8-negligible
 
4.       Waxing jocose Page 8- Skin and Beauty,Manicures
 
5.       Oblivion Page 9-void
 
6.       Ludicrous page 10-ridculous
 
7.       Surliness page 10-coolness
 
8.       Enchantment page 10-fascination
 
9.       Abject page 13-dismal
 
10.   Dilapidation page 14-shabbiness
 
11.   Ajar page 15-partly open
 
12.   Mediocrity page 15-weakness
 
13.   Presentiment page 16-feeling
 
14.   Congenial page 26-affable
 
15.   Conciliatingly   page 17-make peace
 
16.   Dissection page 17-rundown
 
17.   Genus homo page 17- modern humans
 
18.   Stentorian page 19- Extremely Loud
 
19.   Balefully Page 20- full of menacing or malign influences
 
20.   Disquietude page 20-uneasiness
 
21.   Substantive Page 20-significant
 
22.   Acquiesced page 20-go along with
 
23.   Lucid page 21-clear
 
24.   Perplexed page 21-at a loss
 
25.   Frowns page 23-glare
 
26.   Volley Page 24-stream
 
27.   Usurping page 26-take over
 
28.   Provocation Page 26 annoyance
 
29.   Strewing Page 27-mess up
 
30.   Perceptible Page 27-audible
 
31.   Discernment page 27 taste
 
32.   Benighted page 28- Being in a state of moral or intellectual darkness; unenlightened
 
33.   Inelegant page 28-clumsy
 
34.   Waylaid page 29-lay in wait for
 
35.   Lest page 29- in case
 
36.   Queried Page 30-interrogate or quiz
 
37.   Hottentot page 30- often offensive
 
38.   Pour passer le temps page 31- to pass the time
 
39.   Impertinent page 32-impolite
 
40.   Disgorges page 33-pour out
 
41.   Adoration page 34-respect
 
42.   Earnestness page 35-seriousness
 
43.   Urchin page 37-rogue
 
44.   Irascible page 37-testy
 
45.   Expatiating page 38-to wander freely
 
46.   Disconsolate page 40-Melancholy
 
47.   Queer page 41-odd suspicious, dubious, or shady
 
48.   Bohemian page 42- A native or inhabitant of Bohemia
 
49.   Lackadaisical page 42- Lacking spirit, liveliness, or interest; languid
50.   Adonis line page 42- What is an Adonis line? There are two meanings for "Adonis Line". First, it is a line that represents a proportion of 1.618
 
51.   Conventionalism page 42- an aspect of one's personality characterized by extreme regard for and unwavering abiding to societal traditions or values ...
 
52.   Jovial page 42-Cheerful
 
53.   Pantaloons page 43- a man's close-fitting garment for the hips and legs, worn especially in the 19th century, but varying in form from period to period; trousers.
 
54.   Somberness page 43-thoughtulness
 
55.   Un ornamental page 44-unattrative
 
56.   Partition Page 44-dividing wall
 
57.   Gesticulating page 46- Signal
 
58.   Vagaries Page 46- noun, plural vagaries. 1. an unpredictable or erratic action, occurrence, course, or instance: the vagaries of weather; the vagaries of the economic scene.
 
59.   Gambols page 46-Skip
 
60.   Indefatigable page 47-unrelenting
 
61.   Gainsaying page 48-oppose
 
62.   Ardor page 49- enthusiasm
 
63.   Palpable page 50-clear
 
64.   Mulish page 52-stubborn
 
65.   Dyspeptic page 53- pessimistic
 
66.   Obtusity page 53- not sharp or pointed; blunt
 
67.   Agility page 53-Quickness
 
68.   Fain page 57- Ready; willing
 
69.   Asunder page 57- Into separate parts or pieces.
                                
70.   Obtrusively page 57-Conspicuous
 
71.   Remonstrance page 58- An expression of protest, complaint, or reproof, especially a formal statement of grievances.
 
72.   Indignantly page 58-resentfully
 
73.   Ejaculated page 59-cry out
 
74.   Alacrity page 61-promptness
 
 
75.   Repudiation page 61-refutation
 
76.   Smote page 61- To attack, damage, or destroy by or as if by blows.
 
77.   Surmise d page 63-assume
 
78.   Effaced page 63-destroy
 
79.   Pathos page 64-grief
 
80.   Discernment page 65-Judgement
 
81.   Ignominious page 66-reprehensible
 
82.   Bosh page 66- Nonsense.
 
83.   Anathema page 67-abomination
 
84.   Entreatingly page 67-pleed
 
85.   Queried page 68 ask
 
86.   Monotony page 69-dullness
 
87.   Cessation page 70-end termination
 
88.   Irascible page 70-Quick tempered
 
89.   Deign page 71-consent
 
90.   Au revior page 71-goodbye
 
91.   Enlivened page 71 liven up
 
92.   Obnoxious possessor page 71- Truth that is not undergirded by love makes the truth obnoxious and the possessor of it repulsive
 
93.   Perplexities page 72-puzzled
 
94.   Un amiability page 72-unfriendliness
 
95.   Wonted page 73- To request the presence or assistance of.
 
96.   Lamentable page 74-sad
 
97.   Plebeian page 75-popular
 
98.   Contrivance page 76-device  Set up
 
99.   Apparition page 76-specter [presence]
 
100.                        Sagacious page 77-clever
 
101.                        Equanimity page 79- Composure or self Control
 
102.                        Enigmatical page 80-Mysteriously
 
103.                        Petrifaction page 80- The state of being stunned or paralyzed with fear.
 
104.                        Extemporizing page 80-make it up as you go along
 
105.                        Un introduced page 81-indifference
 
106.                        Proffered page 82-offer
 
107.                        Peculiarly page 82-curiously
 
108.                        Roguish page 82-naughty
 
109.                        Gayly page 83- with showiness; showily
 
110.                        Lugubriousness page 84- mournful, dismal, or gloomy, especially in an affected, exaggerated, or unrelieved manner: lugubrious songs of lost love
 
111.                        Presentiment page 84-fear
 
112.                        Foraging page 85 To wander in search of food or provisions.
 
113.                        Raiment page 85- Clothing; garments
 
114.                        Pon page 86- is a telecommunications network that uses point-to-multipoint fiber to the premises in which unpowered optical splitters are used to ...
 
115.                        Remonstrated page 86-argue To reason or plead in protest; present an objection.
 
116.                        Acquiesced page 87-concur
 
117.                        Interposed page 88-introduced
 
118.                        Penitent page 88-regretful
 
119.                        Bodily page 89-physical
 
120.                        Bereft page 89- Lacking something needed or expected.
 
121.                        Odious page 95-horrible
 
122.                        Malicious page 95-spitefull
 
123.                        Gratified page 96-
 
124.                        Indignantly page 96- resentfully
 
125.                        Merrily page 96-Joyfully
 
126.                        Gallantly page 96-boldly
 
127.                        Doubting Thomas page 97- is a skeptic who refuses to believe without direct personal experience
 
128.                        Dejectedly page 97-sadly
 
129.                        Adroitly page 97-nimbly [lightly]
 
130.                        Gayety page 98- gaiety  Cheerfulness
 
131.                        Uninitiated page 98-untrained
 
132.                        Caprice page 98-fancy
 
133.                        Abashed page 98-embarressed
 
134.                        Trifled page 98-touched
 
135.                        Cadaverous page 101-Skeletal
 
136.                        Delightedly page 102-gleefully
 
137.                        Denouement page 103-Conclusion
 
138.                        Mien page 103-look
 
139.                        Impregnable page 105-vulnerable
 
140.                        Antecedents page 105-background
 
141.                        Ostensibly page 106-Superficially
 
142.                        Ostensible page 108-aparent
 
143.                        Impertinent page 108-disrespectful
 
144.                        Trammeled page 109- To hinder the activity or free movement of.
 
145.                        Terminus page 111-end of the line
 
146.                Inamorata page 112- A woman with whom one is in love or has an intimate relationship.
 
147.                        Snappishly page 112- rudely and Gruffly
 
148.                        Idiosyncrasies page 113-unconventional behavior
 
149.                        undercurrents page 114-Hint
 
150.                        bade page 114- To invite to attend; summon
 
151.                        surmising page 118-imagine
 
152.                        faltered page 119-tailed off
 
153.                        eclat page 123- Great brilliance, as of performance or achievement.
 
154.                        peculiarities page 126-oddity
 
155.                        ignominiously page 126- humiliating
 
156.                        pere page 129- Used after a man's surname to distinguish a father from a son.
 
157.                        pertinacious page 129-presistent
 
158.                        prodigious page 130-abnormal
 
159.                        promenade page 130-walkway
 
160.                        betrothed page 135-affianced engaged
 
161.                        waylaying page 136-lay in wait for
 
162.                        cognomen page 136- A family name; a surname.
 
163.                        discomfited page 137-tongue-tied
 
164.                        incongruous page 137-Absurd
 
165.                        jestingly page 137- sport or fun: to speak half in jest
 
166.                        fastidious page 139-Choosy or  persnickety
 
167.                        consternation page 141-Alarm
 
168.                        repast page 142-feast
 
169.                        dereliction page 142-failure
 
170.                        veriest  page143- In a high degree; extremely.
 
171.                        spooniest page 145- Enamored in a silly or sentimental way
 
172.                        fervor page 149-passion
 
173.                        eloquent page 149-expressive
 
174.                        sagacity page 152- level-headedness
 
175.                        Gordian knot page 154- An exceedingly complicated problem or deadlock.
 
176.                        Disdainfully page 154-Scornfully
 
177.                        Lark page 156- joke or prank
 
178.                        Decorum page 157-demureness & respectability
 
179.                        Surmising page 158-conclude
 
180.                        Fervently page 158-passionately
 
181.                        Self- extenuation page 159- alibi, exculpation, excuse, self-justification. a defense of some offensive behavior or some failure to keep a promise etc.
 
182.                        Sagacity page 160-reasonableness
 
183.                        Invectives page 160- an abusive expression or speech . 2: insulting or abusive language
 
184.                        Henceforth page 162- from this day forward
 185.                        Unalloyed 162- Complete; unqualified.
 
NOTES:
Wired Love Dots & Dashes by Ella Cheever Thayer
Source:
 Charlotte Russe
Wikipedia
Source:
 
The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit of Social Criticisms Published 1844
Source:
 
Lady Clara Vere de  Vere
Source:
 
Dombey & Son
Source:
 
Our Mutual Friends
Source:
 
Pillsbury Recipe Charlotte Russe
Source:
 Social Media
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_media
 
 
 
 
Morse code
Invented by Samuel F.B. Morse
 


 
morse-code-__-___-_-_-_-___-_
Morse Code was invented by Samuel Morse for use over telegraph lines in 1835. The code uses a series of dashes and dots to represent letters of the alphabet. However, morse code can be sent using flash lights, whistles, horns, the tapping of stone on stone, a laser light reflected on an object or even by flag. When sending Morse Code by flag, a flag swung to the right represents a dot, to the left a dash. This is a really cool way to send secret messages and to communicate over distance without a phone or walkie talkie. Below is the alphabetic and numeric key for Morse Code.

Morse Code was invented by Samuel Morse for use over telegraph lines in 1835.Morse Code was invented by Samuel Morse for use over telegraph lines in 1835.
 
Source:

 
•––  •• •—•• •   –••    •–••   –––  •••— 
W    I    R       E  D         L        O    V         E
 
–•• ––– •••   •—  —• –••   –••  •–  ••• •••• •  •••
D      O   T    S         A        N    D          D      A     S        H         E   S
 
 
 
Special Note: the Author is influenced heavily by Charles Dickens  She mentions two novels by Mr. Dickens
1.       The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit of Social Criticisms Published 1844 pg 26
 
Social Criticism
 
Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Chuzzlewit
 
2.       Our Mutual Friend Published 1864 pg 99
               Social Commentary
 Source:
 
3.       Dombey & Sons 1848 Pg 74
             Social Criticism
 Source:
 
 
Author: Ella Cheever Thayer
 
Children
1.       Ella Cheever Thayer
                 Born: 14 Sep 1849 Portland Cumberland County Maine
                Died: October 28,  1925 149 West Canton Street  Boston Suffolk County Massachusetts
                 Spouse: Single
                Parents: George Augustus Thayer, Rachel Ella Cheever
                Occupation: 1880 Federal Census Occupation: Telegraph Oper
                                        1900 Federal Census Occupation: Author
                                       Playwright and novelist
                Cause of Death: A Carcinoma of the Liver
                              Cancer of The liver
                  Date of Cremation: October 29, 1925
                 Date of Burial: November 1, 1925
                 Age Death: YRS: 75 MOS: 1 DYS: 14
                Death Certificate #: Volume Number: 2 Page Number: 281 Index Volume Number: 80 N#: 9440
                Informant: Frank Bartlett Thayer [1st Cousin]
               Death Certificate#: R107615
               Date of Record: November 2, 1925
               Inurnment: Biglow  Chapel  in Niche #226 Mt Auburn Cambridge Middlesex County Massachusetts
                Interment:  Cemetery & Crematory Mt Auburn Cambridge Middlesex County Massachusetts
 
Massachusetts Death Records
 
Wikipedia
Ella Cheever Thayer (September 14, 1849 –October 28,  1925) was a playwright and novelist. A former telegraph operator [1] at the Brunswick Hotel[2] in Boston, Massachusetts, who used her experience on the telegraph as the basis for a book ("Wired Love, A Romance of Dots and Dashes"[3] was a bestseller for 10 years[4]). She was a playwright, writing "The Lords of Creation"[5] in 1883 as a suffragette (her play is reviewed in the book "On to Victory: Propaganda Plays of the Woman's Suffrage Movement" by Bettina Friedl, Published in 1990, ISBN 1-55553-073-7) and it was one of the first suffragette plays.[6] She also wrote "Amber, a Daughter of Bohemia"[7] which was a drama in 5 acts in 1883.
 She also wrote short stories for magazines including "The Forgotten Past" in Argosy (magazine) (January, 1897).
She was a resident of Saugus, Massachusetts
 
Source:
 
PURCHASE THROUGH AMAZON.COM
 
1.       The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit of Social Criticisms Published 1844 pg 26
 
Charles Dickens needs no formal introduction, having been the most popular English writer of the 19th century and still one of the most popular writers in history today. Dickens’ upbringing was a mixture of happy times and sad: when he recalled his father being sent to debtor’s prison in his memoirs, his tears actually left marks on the page. Nevertheless, Dickens was obsessed with reading, making him a natural journalist by the age of 20, when he began a career in journalism. Along the way, he also began writing his own short stories and materials, often serializing them in monthly installments in publications, a popular method of publishing in the 19th century. Unlike most writers, Dickens would not write an entire story before it began its serialization, allowing him to work on the fly and leave plot lines up in the air with each opportunity. By the time he died at the relatively young age of 58 from a stroke, he was already Europe’s most famous writer. His obituary noted that Dickens was a “sympathiser with the poor, the suffering, and the oppressed.” Dickens was interred in Westminster Abbey, a rare honor bestowed only among the greatest and most accomplished Britons. Many of Dickens’ novels were written with the concept of social reform in mind, and Dickens’ work was often praised for its realism, comic genius and unique personalities. At the same time, however, Dickens’ ability as a writer was nearly unrivaled, with his ability to write in prose unquestioned and unmatched. His two most famous novels are Great Expectations and A Tale of Two Cities, widely considered two of the West’s best classics. A Tale of Two Cities is often considered the greatest historical fictions of all time. Set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution, the novel depicts the plight of the French peasantry at the hands of the aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution, followed by the brutality of the Reign of Terror. Dickens juxtaposes French society with London’s society during the same period while tracking characters in both cities, including Charles Darnay and Sydney Carton. The classic touches on social justice, romance, morality, good and evil.
 
Source:
 
2.       Our Mutual Friend Published 1864 pg 99
 
Has a dead man any use for money? … What world does money belong to? This world. How can money be a corpse’s?’
 
Our Mutual Friend centres on an inheritance – Old Harmon’s profitable dust heaps – and its legatees, young John Harmon, presumed drowned when a body is pulled out of the River Thames, and kindly dustman Mr Boffin, to whom the fortune defaults. With brilliant satire, Dickens portrays a dark, macabre London, inhabited by such disparate characters as Gaffer Hexam, scavenging the river for corpses; enchanting, mercenary Bella Wilfer; the social climbing Veneerings; and the unscrupulous street-trader Silas Wegg. Dickens’s last completed novel is richly symbolic in its vision of death and renewal in a city dominated by the fetid Thames, and of the corrupting power of money.
This edition uses the text of the first volume edition of 1865, and includes the original illustrations, a chronology, a list for further reading, and appendices on the illustrations and serial plans. Adrian Poole’s introduction examines biblical allusions and the central themes of Our Mutual Friend.
 
Source:
 
3.       Dombey & Sons 1848 Pg 74
 
Paul Dombey is a heartless London merchant who runs his domestic affairs as he runs his business. In the tight orbit of his daily life there is no room for dealing with emotions because emotion has no market value. In his son he sees the future of his firm and the continuation of his name, while he neglects his affectionate daughter, until he decides to get rid of her beloved, a lowly clerk. But Dombey's weakness is his pride, and he falls prey to the treacherous flattery of others. Combining an intricate plot, vivid language, and

Dickens's customary social commentary, Dombey and Son, explores the possibility of moral and emotional redemption through familial love.
 
Source:
 
The Early Poems of Alfred, Lord Tennyson
 
 
Wired Love Dots and Dashes by Ella Cheever Thayer
Pillsbury Company
Amazon.com
Google.com
 
Lord Alferd Tennyson
Charles Dickenson
 
Lord Alfred Tennyson
Born: August 6, 1809 Somerby Lincolnshire England
Died:  October 6, 1872 Lurgashall Sussex England United Kingdom
Spouse: Emily Sellwood
Parents:  George Clayton Tennyson,
                 [1778-1831]
                Elizabeth Fytch
                [1781-1865]
Occupation: Writer/ Poet Laureate
Cause of Death:
Nationality: British
Age at Death: YRS: 83
Interment: West Minister Abbey
 
1st Baron of Tennyson
Poete Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of Victorian Reign
Author of Clara Vere de Vere
 
Charles John Huffan Dickens
Born: February 7, 1812 Land Portsmouth Hamsphire England
Died: June 9, 1870 Gad’s Hill Place Higham Kent England
Spouse: Catherine Thomson Hogarth
Parents: John Dickens, Elizabeth Barrow
Occupation: writer/Social Critic
Nationality: British
Cause of Death: Stroke
Age at Death: YRS: 58
Date of Burial: June 19, 1870
Interment: Poets Corner Westminster Abbey
 
Novelist of Victorian Period
 
 
 
Thesis
 
 

 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Inventeur de l'histoire afro-américaine par le nom de George Crum 1824-1914 Le créateur de la Pomme de terre La collation la plus populaire au monde

Inventeur de l'histoire afro-américaine par le nom de George Crum 1824-1914 Le créateur de la Pomme de terre La collation la plus...